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Departments / ProgramsX-Ray

Almonte General Hospital X-Ray Services

The Almonte General Hospital X-ray area has been expanded to accommodate new equipment, a waiting area and change rooms. The X-ray area also includes $450,000 in new X-ray equipment and a $250,000 Picture Archiving and Communication System (PACS). PACS-the latest technology for the storage, retrieval, distribution and presentation of radiology images-produced an electronic image that can be read by radiologists at the Ottawa Hospital and elsewhere.

An X-ray procedure must be ordered by a doctor.

Unless you are sent from the Emergency Department, you must have an appointment, which is usually arranged by your doctor’s office. If you have been asked to book the appointment yourself, please call 256-2514, extension 2232 to arrange the appointment.

When you arrive, please report to the Hospital Admission Office in the Almonte General Hospital lobby. Be prepared to present your Health Card and your blue Almonte General Hospital card (if you do not have a Hospital card you will be given one when you check in).

Make sure you have the completed requisition form your doctor has given you.

Wear clothing that is easy to remove. Do not wear jewellery.

If you are unable to keep your appointment, notify the X-ray department as soon as possible.

How Do I Prepare for an X-ray?

Plain X-rays of the chest, abdomen, arms, legs and spine require no preparation and generally take only a few minutes to complete.
Please report to the Admitting Department to register 10 to 15 minutes prior to your scheduled appointment time.

Upper GI Series

An upper GI series is an upper gastrointestinal X-ray examination ordered by your doctor and the procedure is performed by a Radiologist.

It requires you to drink a barium suspension (contrast medium) that is used to coat the stomach wall so that it can be visualized with X-ray. This examination can identify problems within the upper gastrointestinal tract, including the esophagus, stomach and small intestine (see small bowel series).

What can I expect from the procedure?

Your stomach must be empty for this examination. Do not eat after 10 p.m. the night before your appointment. If you take pills in the morning, you may take them as usual with a small sip of water. Do not smoke, chew gum or swallow water when you brush your teeth. If you are diabetic, tell staff when you are making your appointment so that it can be scheduled for a time that suits your medications and dietary restrictions. If there is any possibility that you are pregnant, tell the staff at the time of the booking.

During the procedure you will need to change into a hospital gown and the Radiologic Technologist will position you on a special movable table behind an X-ray device called a fluoroscope. You will be asked to drink liquid barium, which will produce air in your stomach, with no ill effects. The Radiologist will ask you to assume various positions and take deep breaths while he/she watches the movement of barium on a television monitor.

The procedure takes about 15 to 20 minutes.

Small Bowel Series

If you are also scheduled for a small bowel series, it will take considerably longer because the barium is being observed as it passes through the entire small intestine (approximately 22 feet) until it reaches the colon. Average time for this examination is usually 1-2 hours.

After the procedure you may feel return to your regular diet, unless directed otherwise by your doctor. Barium can cause constipation (and color your stool white) so it is recommended that you drink several glasses of water or juice after the procedure to eliminate the barium. If you are on a fluid-restricted diet, discuss your fluid intake with your doctor. A mild laxative may also be used but discuss this with your doctor.

Your doctor will receive a written report about two working days after your procedure. A report will be phoned to your doctor sooner, if a serious condition is found.

Barium Enema

A barium enema, or lower GI series, is used to study disorders of the large intestine, colon and rectum by using barium given by means of an enema. Barium is a safe, and is not absorbed into the blood stream. If you are having an air contrast barium enema, air will be used along with the barium during the examination.

What can I expect from the procedure?

After you change into a hospital gown, the Radiologic Technologist will position you on a special movable table behind an x-ray device called a fluoroscope. You will be asked to lie on your side so a lubricated enema tip can be inserted into your rectum. While the barium is flowing through your colon the radiologist or physician assistant watches the movement of the barium on a television monitor. (For air contrast barium enemas, air will be introduced after the barium.) X-rays of selected areas will be taken while the colon is filling. Once the colon is filled, the technologist will then use a different piece of x-ray equipment to evaluate the entire lower digestive system. In order to get all the pictures needed for a barium enema series you will be asked to turn in different positions and to hold your breath while the X-rays are being taken. When the series of X-rays has been completed, you will be directed to the bathroom to expel the barium. One last X-ray may be taken after some of the barium has been expelled. The average time for a barium enema examination is 30 to 45 minutes.

After the procedure you may feel return to your regular diet, unless directed otherwise by your doctor. Barium can cause constipation (and color your stool white) so it is recommended that you drink several glasses of water or juice after the procedure to eliminate the barium. If you are on a fluid-restricted diet, discuss your fluid intake with your doctor. A mild laxative may also be used but discuss this with your doctor.

Your doctor will receive a written report about two working days after your procedure. A report will be phoned to your doctor sooner, if a serious condition is found.

I.V.P. – Intravenous Pyelogram

An I.V.P. (intravenous pyelogram) is a special X-ray examination of the kidneys, ureters and the bladder. X-ray dye is injected into a vein and it is filtered from the blood by the kidneys and can be used to demonstrate kidney stones and other abnormalities of the urinary tract. The dye is removed from the body in the urine.

The procedure takes 30 to 60 minutes, although it can be longer if stones are present.

  • Preparation - If done on an emergency basis there is no preparation.
  • If the procedure is booked, a clear fluid diet is required 1 day before the exam - do not eat solid foods, eggs, milk or dairy products. Do not eat anything after 9 p.m. the night before the examination. Clear fluids are permitted at any time. If you are diabetic you may eat normally and take your medication as usual.
  • Purchase one bottle of X-prep from any pharmacy and follow the instructions on the bottle.

What can I expect from the procedure?

During the procedure, the technologist will take a preliminary X-ray film to ensure the kidney area is not obscured. You will be asked about your medical history and allergies. If you have had a previous reaction to X-ray dye, it is very important that you tell your doctor before the procedure begins.

Your doctor will inject X-ray dye into a vein in your arm or hand. As the solution is injected, you may experience a metallic taste in your mouth and a mild warm sensation throughout your body. These are normal reactions.

The technologist will then take a series of X-rays at timed intervals. The examination will take about 45 minutes.

Mild allergic reactions such as itching and hives occasionally occur. These may go away without treatment or may respond quickly to medication. If these reactions occur, they will be explained and treated by the radiologist and/or physician.

After the procedure, the dye is gradually removed from your blood by your kidneys and stored in your bladder until you urinate. The colour of your urine will not change. You may resume your normal diet immediately, unless advised otherwise by your physician.

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